Stanadyne’s Performance Formula. Stanadyne, being a major manufacturer of fuel injection systems in America has formulated an all season additive and has been proven by an independent research institute to out-perform all others on the market. Performance Formula increases cetane for better starting, increases power and more MPG, prevents injector plugging, removes combustion deposits, helps remove water, prevents corrosion, improves lubricity and has anti-gelling ingredients to help prevent freeze up. Stanadyne’s Performance Formula has received the recommendations of these major engine companies: Caterpillar, General Motors, Ford, John Deere, Navistar, Volvo-Penta, and Bosch.

Yes, not all additives are alike. There are no standards to control what additives are made of. Some fuel additives are formulated for winter use to reduce fuel gelling and do little to protect your fuel system. Others may be mostly solvents to clean deposits from your injectors and do nothing to improve the lubricity of the fuel.

First, treat your fuel with a good quality winter additive to lower its pour and cold filter plug points. We recommend Stanadyne’s Performance Formula because it also boosts the cetane number to improve cold weather starting.
Second, change your fuel filter element and check it frequently.
Third, consider an in-line fuel heater.
Fourth, an engine block heater is a good idea when the temperatures drop below the teens.
Finally, if your fuel does gel and clogs your fuel filter, in an urgent situation an alcohol additive may be added to your fuel tank and filter element. The fuel should start flowing again in a few minutes. Warning – use of heavy alcohol-containing additives may damage non-metal materials in your fuel system.

Diesel fuel quality is declining throughout the world, and we expect the trend to continue. In fact, a recent survey suggests that 70% of diesel fuel sold at service stations does not meet the SAE standard for diesel fuel lubricity. The three leading factors are:

  • Crude Oil Sources
  • Refining Techniques
  • Blending Techniques

These fuel quality issues can be addressed by using a quality additive, such as Stanadyne’s Performance Formula, which helps protect against excessive wear and corrosion while increasing both power and fuel economy.

Repair times will vary depending on the type of pump or injectors. Often we can repair your pump or injectors the same day. Some types of pumps take longer and we will need one to two days for a complete overhaul. In any case, we can always offer a faster turnaround if we know ahead of time that your unit is coming in. If you are in a hurry or concerned about the price you may consider one of our many exchange pumps.

Each fuel injection problem is unique and has to be addressed on an individual basis. All of our work is “as necessary.” Each repair is evaluated as to the nature and extent of failure, with regard to the best solution for each customer. You will be presented with as many options as possible to resolve any problem that you may have

We have many of the common pumps and injectors for General Motors, Ford, Cummins, John Deere, International and Perkins available for exchange. All of our exchange units are rebuilt in our facility and receive the same standard of repair that you would receive if we rebuilt your unit. Our exchange prices are based on an average cost of repair to units similar to yours.

The cost of repair may vary depending on the make and model of your fuel injection pump or injectors. In many cases we can offer you one of our many exchange pumps. We will be happy to make an e-mail estimate.

We warranty rebuilt pumps, injectors and turbochargers for 12 months or 50,000 miles. Partial repairs are warranted only for the parts replaced or subcomponents that were rebuilt. Most performance product installations are warranted for 12 months. Warranty on most electrical and electronic equipment is 90 days.

Typical turbo failures are recognizable by the following symptoms: Engine lacks power, black exhaust smoke, excessive engine oil consumption, blue exhaust smoke, noisy turbocharger, cyclic sound coming from the turbocharger, oil leak from compressor seal or an oil leak from the turbine seal.

Generally speaking, no. Turning up the fuel may cause the engine to smoke and violate emission standards. On some engines there are performance options which will improve the performance of your engine without violating emission standards. These options may include such things as improving the way your engine breaths by altering the air intake or exhaust system, improved turbocharger housing design, and altering the timing and torque curve of the fuel pump.

Generally speaking, no. Turning up the fuel may cause the engine to smoke and violate emission standards. On some engines there are performance options which will improve the performance of your engine without violating emission standards. These options may include such things as improving the way your engine breaths by altering the air intake or exhaust system, improved turbocharger housing design, and altering the timing and torque curve of the fuel pump.

Automatic transmissions in today’s diesel trucks are capable of handling performance increases of about 20% or in most cases up to 60 hp. Horsepower increases of more than 60 hp may require transmission modifications. GM trucks with the Allison transmission have the ability for the computer to learn the power of your engine and your driving habits and adjust accordingly. It is recommended that you not be changing the power settings on your computer module to frequently. The computer needs to relearn each time a condition changes and transmission damage can occur if the power level in increased before the computer has had the opportunity to relearn. For Dodge trucks equipped with an automatic transmission a BD performance torque converter and valve body installed makes a nice enhancement. The torque converter should be matched to the horsepower of your engine. Increasing the horsepower of the engine will increase the slippage of your torque converter. A BD performance torque converter will reduce the slippage and transfer the torque of your engine to the rear wheels. The valve body increases the pressures on your clutch packs for better holding with the higher torque from the engine. Ford trucks the pressures are increased by plugging in a Trany Controller into your wiring harness.

Our products and recommendations are to enhance the efficiency of the engine. The OEM does not want to be responsible for any side effects of aftermarket products. The products we recommend do not void the OE warranty but aftermarket products are not covered by your OE warranty.

Our recommendations and our products will meet constant load test or snap idle testing emission standards. We do not make alterations that would cause your engine to smoke and violate emission standards.

Performance computer modules are designed for performance improvements and not fuel economy, however they do generally improve fuel economy. Increasing the power by increasing the fuel to the engine means a bigger fire in the combustion chamber which creates more exhaust flow. More exhaust flow means that the turbo spins faster and creates more turbo boost pressure. More boost pressure means that the engine efficiency is improved and if you are not to hard on the accelerator pedal you may achieve better fuel economy. The computer module, the air intake system and the performance exhaust system all compliment each other to a more efficient engine.

The #1 way to increase fuel economy is to slow down! The difference in fuel economy between 60-65 mph and 70-75 mph can be as much as 2-4 miles per gallon. Your diesel engine has a specific rpm that produces the most efficency and this is generally very close to where peak torque is located. The 12 valve Dodges (1989-1998) need to run at 1600-1700 rpm, with the 24 valve engines (1999-2002) needing to run 1800-2000 rpm, and finally the HPCR Dodge engines (2003-2007) need to run 1900-2100 rpm. Fuel economy can also be increased by improving the efficiency of your engine which means, releasing energy that the engine is already producing. Improving the engine’s ability to breath contributes to the engine’s ability to operate more efficiently. An AFE cold air intake system and a performance exhaust system will provide good benefits to fuel economy. On the newer trucks that have catalytic converters we can install a 4 inch high flow straight through muffler and tail pipe. Stanadyne Performance Formula has also been a proven to increase power and fuel mileage by improving the properties of the fuel for a more efficient combustion. The improvement in fuel mileage exceeds the cost of the additive plus you get the added bonus of lubricity improvers, corrosion inhibiters, cleaning agents, fuel stabilizer, and anti-gel. All of these add up to reduced maintenance costs of the engine and fuel injection system.

The typical pattern failures on the Duramax diesel engine include hard starting (extended cranking time until it starts), and low power or light blue or white smoke out the exhaust. A hard start with extended cranking times is usually due to the fuel system being unable to achieve a high enough rail pressure for the engine to start. This can be caused by one or more of the injectors failing or a weak CP3 high pressure pump. Another source could be the FCA (fuel control actuator on the CP3 high pressure pump) to become stuck in a closed position. This FCA can also fail in a manner that causes surging at idle. Low power and light blue or white smoke at idle can be an indication that one or more injectors have begun to fail. The reason for stalling or extremely low power is most likely a plugged fuel filter. Note: GM has superseded the fuel filter for the Duramax engine and the updated part has a stepped design that has a smaller diameter on the bottom portion of the filter cartridge.

General Motors used a Stanadyne DS fuel injection pump on the 1994-1999 6.5L diesel engines.  The DS pump is computer controlled by a device called a primary control module (PCM).  The PCM reads data sent to it from the encoder sensor located internally in the pump and a pump mounted driver (PMD) .  Either the PMD or encoder sensor may fail intermittently and cause the engine to stall.  You need to hook up a scan tool to read the fault codes stored in the computer to make a determination of the failure.  A trained technician is helpful here, there may be other conditions on the vehicle that can effect the operation of the fuel pump as well.  It may not be necessary to replace the fuel pump, some conditions may be remedied on the vehicle.

Injectors are one of the most critical parts of your fuel system, but often overlooked.  The injector nozzle determines how the fuel is mixed with the air in your combustion chamber.  You don’t want to take any chances here.  We recommend that your injectors be checked and or replaced after 4000 hours or 150,000 miles.  Even though they may still be working good, tests made by large trucking fleets have proven that changing injectors is good preventative maintenance that avoids costly down time, extends engine life and assures good fuel economy.

From 1982-93 both Ford and General Motors used a fuel injection pump made by Stanadyne.  Stanadyne controlled the advance of the timing by applying primary fuel pressure to an advance piston which rotated a cam ring to advance the timing.

This method works fairly well, but in time, approximately 100,000 miles, the advance piston will wear the bore in the housing where it rides and affects the timing in which fuel is delivered to your engine.  As your fuel pump ages, this wear comes on gradually and is probably unnoticed until, that is, it reaches the point where it causes your engine to puff out some light blue smoke. Prior to this you may experience a reduction in performance and fuel mileage.  There are other parts that wear in the pump as well, so when your pump reaches this point, it’s time for an overhaul.

Yes, there are replacement electric fuel pumps that can be installed.  The 2004 1/2 Dodge comes with a fuel supply pump that is mounted in the fuel tank.  Chrysler is offering this, in tank fuel pump kit, as a retro fit for the earlier trucks.  We recommend the FASS pumps made by Diesel Performance Products (DPP)  These pumps are heavy duty and supply more than adequate the amount of fuel that is required, even for serious performance upgrades.  They are backed by a LIFETIME warranty and are rebuildable.  The Dodge application is the most common, but FASS also offers fuel supply pumps for the GM Duramax, and Ford Powerstroke as well as many other applications.

Failure of the fuel supply pump or low fuel pressure is often not noticed in the drivability of the truck. Often the first symptom is what is referred to as “dead pedal syndrome” or no response when the accelerator pedal is depressed. Generally by the time symptoms are noticed damage has already been done to the Bosch VP44 fuel injection pump. The low fuel pressure warning light is a good investment.

Some typical problems associated with the HPCR system on the 2003-2007 Dodge pickups could include hard starting (extended cranking time until it starts), starting and stalling repeatedly, and low power or light blue or white smoke out the exhaust.  A hard start with extended cranking times is usually due to the fuel system being unable to achieve a high enough rail pressure for the engine to start.  This can be caused by one or more of the injectors failing and allow the fuel rail pressure to be bled off and a hard start to occur. Another source could be the FCA (fuel control actuator on the CP3 high pressure pump) to become stuck in a closed position.  This FCA can also fail in a manner that would cause surging at idle.  Intermittent stalling can be caused by the fuel supply pump failing on the 2003-2004.5 model year trucks.  Low power and light blue or white smoke at idle can be an indication that one or more injectors have begun to fail.

As a rule of thumb, there are three things that effect starting of a diesel engine. One is cranking speed. Commonly, a diesel engine needs to crank at approximately 200 RPM to start properly. A few things to check would be the condition of your batteries, the battery cables, and the starter.

The second is compression. Diesel engines rely on the heat generated by compressing the air in the combustion chamber to ignite the fuel. If the compression is low, the heat is low as well. An engine which uses glow plugs to start when the engine is cold may experience a hard-start condition when the engine is warm if the compression is low.

Third is the condition of the fuel system. If the fuel pump is weak or the conditions of the injectors are poor, the engine may be hard to start. On some fuel systems, hard-starting may be the first sign of a fuel pump that is failing. If the fuel tank is located lower than the fuel injection pump, a leak in the fuel system may allow the fuel to drain back to the tank when the engine sits for several hours.

The 7.3L, and 6.0L Ford Powerstroke uses an HEUI system (Hydraulic Electronic Unit Injector). This system is a combination of hydraulics, pressure regulators, sensors, and relays. Hard starting, no-start, blue/white exhaust smoke and rough running are signs that your engine needs to be serviced by a qualified technician.

In short, if your engine and starting system are in good condition, you need to call on us to put your fuel system back in good order again.

HPCR is an abbreviation for High Pressure Common Rail. In this type of fuel system a gear driven piston pump delivers high pressure fuel to a rail that is common to all the injectors in the engine. The fuel pressure is typically around 5000 psi at idle and can reach 26000 psi at wide open throttle under full load. The ECM decides which injector it is going to turn on and for how long it will be turned on. With the high pressure fuel in the common rail, the ECM only has to activate each individual injector and the fuel is sprayed into the cylinder and compressed and burned. As always it is never a good practice to replace parts without proper diagnosis and these complex systems cannot be diagnosed over the phone or without the use of a scan tool. Beware of budget code readers, these scan tools only read generic OBD II codes and cannot perform diagnostic tests. (THEY WILL NOT HELP YOU DIAGNOSE YOUR VEHICLE)

The electric fuel supply pump tends to be a common item to fail on the 1998 1/2 through 2002 Dodges. These trucks are equipped with a Bosch VP44 fuel injection pump. The Bosch VP44 fuel pump needs to be fed by a positive fuel pressure from an electric fuel supply pump. The Bosch fuel pump will draw fuel from the tank in the absence of being fed, however this causes the pump to operate in a negative pressure. Operating with a negative pressure causes cavitations in the Bosch VP44 injection pump which results in a premature failure. We recommend checking the fuel supply pump pressure periodically and or installing a low fuel pressure warning light.